by Sandra Goroff

 

Perhaps it is because we waited so long or perhaps it is because we endured what seemed like an unbelievably long and painful winter, this spring feels particularly exciting –strangely new — almost as if we are experiencing it for the first time. Perhaps that is just the way spring is.

 

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I am completely smitten with spring skies — often steely and raw; the dramatic contrast between soft budding and blossoming trees against a gray or deep blue palette. In a single photograph of the sky last week, I spotted shades of vanilla, cashmere gray and cornflower blue. (I love cornflower blue) The sky is not just BLUE, the leaves are not just GREEN.

 

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As a photographer — and increasingly as a person — I try to live in the moment — to be mindful. Like photography, this takes practice (lots of it). Photography is a wise teacher and a good companion; I become more aware, I open my eyes and really look around, I stop to appreciate and feel beauty in unexpected places, and best of all, in seeing and in photographing, I forget about myself for a few precious moments or hours. So much the better if I come away with some memorable shots I like.

 

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HERE ARE SOME TIPS ON SPRING PHOTOGRAPHY

 

  • Walk vs ride. Walking gives you the chance to experience nature in an intimate way. Always take your camera along.
  • Pay Attention to what is around you from the smallest bud to changing clouds and light. Remember light changes everything. Photograph spring at different times of day and during different weather. Don’t be afraid of a few sprinkles — they won’t hurt your camera.
  • Look Up. Your best shot may be a single branch of blossoms against the sky. Don’t insist on a clear, unobstructed view – photographing a scene or shot in layers can be be very rewarding — things in front of things – things behind things — you never know what you will capture. While simplicity usually trumps chaos in great shots and is my preference — spring by its very nature is busy. Photograph what YOU see — allow it to be what it is.
  • Nature is a beautiful backdrop but it is gorgeous all by itself. Consider both wide views and small, fractured parts of the whole. Remember you can always focus in by cropping your shot to perfection later.
  • Watch where you are standing. Move around — experiment with your position and see how it changes what you see in your view finder.
  • Get Outside Now — the pink petals and baby green buds will only last so long.

 

 

Sandra Goroff is a long time art and literary publicist nationally and internationally. Her passions are photography, art, antiques, watercolor and design (fiance Burt and cat, Benjamin). She has worked with such notable talents such as : Colin Cowie, antiques and collectibles expert, Judith Miller, Garrison Keillor, Maurice Sendak, Chris Van Allsburg, Clive Cussler, Tom Peters and Newbury Street (Boston) Art Gallery. Sandra Goroff is represented by the fine art gallery Walker Cunningham. For more info contact Sarah@walkercunningham.com..

For more of Sandra’s work, see her book, Solitary Soul.

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You can find Sandra’s on:

Twitter: Sandra Goroff at @sandygm
Facebook at Sympatico Photography by Sandra Goroff
Pinterest at Sandra Goroff
Professional Website: SandraGoroff.com
Solitary Soul Website: SolitarySoul.com
Email address: sgma@aol.com

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